Unit 24. will be doing and will have done – grammar in use

A. Study this example situation:
Kevin loves football and this evening there is a big football match on television. The match begins at 7.30 and ends at 9.15. Paul wants to see Kevin the same evening and wants to know what time to come to his house.
PAUL: Is it all right if I come at about 8.30?
KEVIN: No, I’ll be watching the football then.
PAUL: Well, what about 9.30?
KEVIN: Fine. The match will have finished by then.
B. ‘I will be doing something’ (future continuous) = I will be in the middle of doing something. The football match begins at 7.30 and ends at 9.15. So during this time, for example at 8.30, Kevin will be watching the match. Another example:
* I’m going on holiday on Saturday. This time next week I’ll be lying on a beach or
Swimming in the sea.
Compare will be (do)ing and will (do):
* Don’t phone me between 7 and 8. We’ll be having dinner then.
* Let’s wait for Mary to arrive and then we’ll have dinner.
Compare will be ~ing with other continuous forms:
* At 10 o’clock yesterday, Sally was in her office. She was working. (past)
It’s 10 o’clock now. She is in her office. She is working. (present)
At 10 o’clock tomorrow, she will be in her office. She will be working.
C. We also use will be doing in a different way: to talk about complete actions in the future:
* A: If you see Sally, can you ask her to phone me?
B: Sure. I’ll be seeing her this evening, so I’ll tell her then.
* What time will your friends be arriving tomorrow?
In these examples will be ~ing is similar to the present continuous for the future. (See Unit 19A.)
You can use Will you be ~ing…? to ask about somebody’s plans, especially if you want something or want them to do something. For example:
* A: Will you be passing the post office when you’re out?
B: Probably. Why?
A: I need some stamps. Could you get me some?
* A: Will you be using your bicycle this evening?
B: No. Do you want to borrow it?
D. We use will have (done) (future perfect) to say that something will already be complete. Kevin’s football match ends at 9.15. So after this time, for example at 9.30, the match will have finished. Some more examples:
* Sally always leaves for work at 8.30 in the morning, so she won’t be at home at 9
O’clock. She’ll have gone to work.
* We’re late. The film will already have started by the time we get to the cinema.
Compare will have (done) with other perfect forms:
* Ted and Amy have been married for 24 years. (present perfect)
Next year they will have been married for 25 years.
When their first child was born, they had been married for three years. (past perfect)


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Unit 24. will be doing and will have done – grammar in use