Grimm brother “bearskin”

There was once upon a time a young fellow who enlisted for a soldier, and became so brave and courageous that he was always in the front ranks when it rained blue beans.[1] As long as the war lasted all went well, but when peace was concluded he received his discharge, and the captain told him he might go where he liked. His parents meanwhile had died, and as he had no longer any home to go to he paid a visit to his brothers, and asked them to give him shelter until war broke out again. His brothers, however, were hard-hearted, and said, “What could we do with you? We could make nothing of you; see to what you have brought yourself”; and so turned a deaf ear. The poor Soldier had nothing but his musket left; so he mounted this on his shoulder and set out on a tramp. By and by he came to a great heath with nothing on it but a circle of trees, under which he sat down, sorrowfully considering his fate. “I have no money,” thought he; “I have learnt nothing but

soldiering, and now, since peace is concluded, there is no need of me. I see well enough I shall have to starve.” All at once he heard a rustling, and as he looked round he perceived a stranger standing before him, dressed in a gray coat, who looked very stately, but had an ugly cloven foot. “I know quite well what you need,” said this being; “gold and other possessions you shall have, as much as you can spend; but first I must know whether you are a coward or not, that I may not spend my money foolishly.”

“A soldier and a coward!” replied the other, “that cannot be; you may put me to any proof.”

“Well, then,” replied the stranger, “look behind you.”

The Soldier turned and saw a huge bear, which eyed him very ferociously. “Oho!” cried he, “I will tickle your nose for you, that you shall no longer be able to grumble”; and, raising his musket, he shot the bear in the forehead, so that he tumbled in a heap upon the ground, and did not stir afterward. Thereupon the stranger said, “I see quite well that you are not wanting in courage; but there is yet one condition which you must fulfil.” “If it does not interfere with my future happiness,” said the Soldier, who had remarked who it was that addressed him; “if it does not interfere with that, I shall not hesitate.”

“That you must see about yourself!” said the stranger. “For the next seven years you must not wash yourself, nor comb your hair or beard, neither must you cut your nails nor say one paternoster. Then I will give you this coat and mantle, which you must wear during these seven years; and if you die within that time you are mine, but if you live you are rich, and free all your life long.”

The Soldier reflected for awhile on his great necessities, and, remembering how often he had braved death, he at length consented, and ventured to accept the offer. Thereupon the Evil One pulled off the gray coat, handed it to the soldier, and said, “If you at any time search in the pockets of your coat when you have it on, you will always find your hand full of money.” Then also he pulled off the skin of the bear, and said, “That shall be your cloak and your bed; you must sleep on it, and not dare to lie in any other bed, and on this account you shall be called ‘Bearskin.'” Immediately the Evil One disappeared.

The Soldier now put on the coat, and dipped his hands into the pockets, to assure himself of the reality of the transaction. Then he hung the bearskin around himself, and went about the world chuckling at his good luck, and buying whatever suited his fancy which money could purchase.



Grimm brother “bearskin”