Free time

Give Details on How Your Age Group Spends Free Time
Psychologists say that theoretically all the teenagers can be divided into two groups: formal and informal. Teenagers from formal groups generally spend their leisure time doing sports, shopping, sightseeing, theatre-going or watching TV.
It’s a truth universally acknowledged that sport helps people to keep fit and beat stress and negative emotions. But taking sports seriously is no fun at all. People used to argue that sports were of value because they built character. They claimed that games promoted hard work, sportsmanship, and the joy of playing. But to many today such arguments sound hollow, even hypocritical. The emphasis on winning is particularly a problem. For many young people sport is no longer a run around a basketball court twice a week or a game of tennis twice a week on a warm day. It is a serious and expensive business involving hours of daily training. For some kids whose training starts at a very

early age, it is reflected in the increasing number of world champions in the teens. As for me swimming was my life until I was twelve. My father wanted me to do well because he never really made it as a swimmer. I used to train twice a day. My dad would drive me to the pool and wait for me. It was a huge sacrifice but I don’t regret it although I had to quit it for school was more important. Of course my dad was disappointed but sports made me a high achiever. I also had lots of friends as others looked up at me.
I even didn’t mind injuries and strain. However, recent studies suggest that overtraining can lead to stunted growth, skeletal injuries, and eating disorders in athletes who need to keep slim, such as gymnasts.
Snobs like to throw parties and to invite the rich and famous. Such guests usually raise the tone of the party greatly and other teenagers are usually sufficiently impressed by national sports people, famous fashion models, and offsprings of rich and famous people, aspiring poets or the owners of posh cars or promising starlets. I personally adore the parties. It’s a terrific opportunity to meet new people. Every party benefits greatly from those who are the life and soul of it. They gladly take the lead in making a fool of him or herself and set everybody at ease. Such a person not always has a high IQ and even lower sense of humour, but people very often are charmed by good mixers, go-getters, machos and chatterboxes. I prefer the quite relaxed company of those intellectuals who are able to make conversation or communicate verbally. I try to avoid the company of those who are so plain and anonymous that their own mothers would have difficulty recognizing them. They are usually ignored in real life.
Art lovers attend exhibitions and enjoy world famous paintings, rare sculptures, and the remains of ancient civilizations. They are ready to listen to most boring lectures about Egyptian pyramids for hours on end. As a result their brain is armed with an unbelievable store of facts and figures from literature, history and natural sciences, history and geography. Teachers usually speak very highly of their erudition and knowledge. I am usually drawn to such “walking encyclopedias”. It’s a shame that some of them are very introverted and turn out to be either “a blue stocking” or tedious bookworms.
Though I am not a great theatre-goer I don’t mind watching an exciting play, a beautiful ballet or a talented opera. Last month I went to see a new production of Hamlet. The sets were incredible realistic and the costumes were wonderful.



Free time