David kootnikoff u2 the story of the band chapter 2

A New Song: Boy & October (1980-1982)

Martin Hannett was hot property in 1980. He had been responsible
For the haunting sound at the heart of the most respected band of the
Day, Joy Division. When U2 was considering a producer for their
Debut, they were invited to the “Love Will Tear Us Apart” sessions to
Observe Hannett and the band at work. Edge thought everything
Seemed a bit too precious and mannered for rock and roll, but Joy
Division weren’t simple posers – they played dark music because that
Was who they were. When U2 played Hannett their demo for “11
O’Clock Tick Tock,” he said he wasn’t too impressed with the production,
But liked the song. Hannett was invited to Dublin to record
The single over the Easter weekend, and they entered Windmill Lane
Studios for the first time;Windmill Lane would become U2’s home
Studio for years to come.
The

band had some trouble accommodating Hannett’s coveted
Sound and style. Larry and Adam were in for the hardest time, and
Edge was a bit surprised at Hannett’s seeming indifference to overdubs.
In the end, “11 O’Clock Tick Tock” is a great record – a clash
Of metallic sparks and the template for Edge’s signature guitar sound,
But not a hit. Either way, the recording was the breakthrough U2 was
Looking for: it defined their futuristic rock sound and began to separate
Them from the pack. The idea for the title had come from an
Expression Gavin Friday used meaning “the end of the day.” He had come around to Bono’s home one night and left a note on his door
With the phrase. It struck a chord with Bono and he filed it away.
Later, when Bono was looking over the crowd at a London show of
The gothic-psychobilly band the Cramps, he thought they resembled
Zombies at the end of days and wrote the lyric soon after.1
By spring 1980 the band had finally purchased an old van and
Were touring up and down Ireland and Britain. They stayed in bedand-
Breakfasts that veered from nylon sheets to plush cushions. The
Band had a hard time adjusting to life on the road. Each member had
His own approach: Adam enjoyed the late-night parties more than
The others, whereas Larry just needed some clean sheets and Space
Invaders to get through the night. Paul was turning out to be a savvy
Manager, always on the lookout for anything that might elevate U2’s
Image. One strategy was to try to fill every venue U2 played. He
Would book the band into places that were a bit smaller than their
Following would allow, and only agreed to play two nights if U2 could
Be guaranteed to get a capacity crowd for each show. This helped create
A buzz that the band was a big deal, and next time tickets would
Be in greater demand.
Onstage, U2 was unlike any of their contemporaries. Whereas
Joy Division embodied their funereal music in their fashion and
Demeanor, other bands seemed to be putting on appearances. During
The post-punk era it was considered cool to stand around on stage
Without working up a sweat. U2 reacted against this pose and tried to
Put on blistering performances whenever they got the chance. Bono
Would run around the stage and climb on the speakers, whereas bands
Like Echo and the Bunnymen were content to play it cool and stand
Still.
After “11 O’Clock Tick Tock” was released in May, U2 began to
Make plans for their debut album. They had arranged for Hannett to
Produce, but he was wrapped up with Joy Division. Then when Joy
Division singer Ian Curtis committed suicide, plans dissolved. As U2



David kootnikoff u2 the story of the band chapter 2