At least three good reasons for testers to learn to program

There is a common claim, especially in the Agile community, that suggests that all testers should be able to write programs. I don’t think that’s the case. In the Rapid Software Testing class, James Bach and I say that testing is “questioning a product in order to evaluate it”. That’s the short form of my personal definition of testing, “investigation of people, software, computers, and related goods and services, and the relationships between them”. Most people who use computer programs are not computer programmers, and there are many ways in which a tester can question and investigate a product without programming.

Yet there are at least three very good reasons why it might be a good idea for a tester to learn to program.

Tooling. Computer programs extend our capacity to sense what’s happening, to make decisions, and to perform actions. There are many wonderful packaged tools, in dozens of categories, available to us testers.

Every tool offers some level of control through a variety of affordances. Some provide restrictive controls, like text fields or drop-down lists or check boxes. Other tools provide macros so that we can string together sequences of actions. Some tools come with full-blown scripting languages that provide the capacity for the tester to sense, decide, and act through the tool in very flexible and specific ways. There are also, of course, general-purpose programming and scripting languages in their own right. When we can use programming concepts and programming languages, we have a more powerful and adaptable tool set for our investigations.

Insight. When we learn to program, we develop understanding about the elements and construction of programs and the computers on which they run. We learn how data is represented inside the computer, and how bits can be interpreted and misinterpreted. We learn about flow control, decision points, looping, and branching – and how mistakes can be made. We might even be able to read the source code of the programs that we’re testing, which can be valuable in review, troubleshooting, or debugging. Even if we never see our programs’ source code, when we learn about how programs work, we gain insight into how they might not work.

Humility. Dan Spear, a great programmer at Quarterdeck and a good friend, once pointed out to me that programming a computer is one of the most humbling experiences available to us. When you program a computer to perform some task, it will reflect – often immediately and often dramatically – any imprecision in your instructions and your underlying ideas. When we learn to program, we get insight not only into how a program works, but also into how difficult programming can be. This should trigger respect for programmers, but it should also trigger something else: empathy, which – as Jerry Weinberg says – is the first and most important aspect of the emotional set and setting for the tester.



At least three good reasons for testers to learn to program