A post-industrial a to z digital battledore

New times demand new words, because the old words don’t help us see the world differently.

Along the way, I’ve invented a few, and it occurs to me that sometimes I use them as if you know what I’m talking about. Here, with plenty of links, are 26 of my favorite neologisms (the longest post of the year, probably):

A is for Artist: An artist is someone who brings humanity to a problem, who changes someone else for the better, who does work that can’t be written down in a manual. Art is not about oil painting, it’s about bringing creativity and insight to work, instead of choosing to be a compliant cog. (from Linchpin).

B is for Bootstrapper: A bootstrapper is someone who starts a business with no money and funds growth through growth. The internet has made bootstrapping much easier than ever, because the costs of creating and marketing remarkable things are cheaper than ever. It’s really important not to act like you’re well-funded if you’re intent on bootstrapping (and vice versa). You can read the Bootstrapper’s Bible for free.

C is for Choice: I didn’t coin the term the Long Tail, but I wish I had. It describes a simple law: given the choice, people will take the choice. That means that digital commerce enables niches. Aggregating and enabling the long tail accounts for the success of eBay, iTunes, Amazon, Craigslist, Google and even match. com.
D is for Darwin: Things evolve. But evolution is speeding up (and yes, evolving). While it used to take a hundred thousand years for significant changes to happen to our physical culture, the nature of information and a connected society means that ‘everything’ might change in just a few months. Ideas that spread, win and organizations that learn from their mistakes lead the rest of us. (from Survival is Not Enough)

E is for Edgecraft: Brainstorming doesn’t work so well, because most people are bad at it.

They’re bad at it because their lizard brain takes over moments before a big idea is uttered. “Oh no!” it says, “I better not say that because if I do, then I’ll have to do it.” And so brainstorming quickly becomes clever stalling and timewasting. Far better is to practice edgegraft. Someone announces a direction (“we’ll be really convenient, we’ll offer our menu by fax,”) and then the next person goes closer to that edge, topping it, (“we’ll offer it by email!”) and so on, each topping the other in any particular direction. (from the book Free Prize Inside)

F is for the Free Prize: People often don’t buy the obvious or measured solution to their problem, they buy the extra, the bonus, the feeling and the story. The free prize is the layout of Google – the search results are the same, but the way the search feels is why you choose to search there. If engineers thought more about the free prize, we’d need fewer marketers.
G is for Go go go™: I just trademarked this one, but you have my permission to use it all you like. Go go go is the mantra of someone who has committed to defeating their anxiety and ignoring their lizard brain. Not a good strategy for airline pilots, but for the rest of us, a little Go go go might be just the ticket.

H is for broken: Isn’t it just like a marketer to compromise when he should have organized better in the first place? There’s a lot in our consumer society that’s broken, but try to avoid getting obsessed with it. Far better to ship your own stuff that’s not broken instead.

I is for Ideavirus: A decade ago a wrote a book that was free. It still is.



A post-industrial a to z digital battledore